ENDLESS FRONTIER:
INNOVATIONS IN SCIENCE & ENGINEERING

November 2015

Health/Convergence

The future of nanotechnology and computers so small you can swallow them
An ingestible sensor invented by Albert Swiston at MIT measures heart and breathing rates from within the digestive tract. An NPR All Tech Considered story http://n.pr/1R6DfWg.
Learn more at http://bit.ly/1POzGTO.

Education

MIT named No. 1 university worldwide for social sciences
The Times Higher Education World University Rankings has named MIT the No. 1 university worldwide for social sciences for 2015-2016. The subjects covered in the ranking include economics, political science, anthropology, urban planning, communication, and business, among others.
Learn more at http://bit.ly/1QsMj7z.

Science & Tech

Shocking new way to get the salt out
As the availability of clean, potable water becomes an increasingly urgent issue in many parts of the world, researchers are searching for new ways to treat salty, brackish or contaminated water to make it usable. Now a team at MIT has come up with an innovative approach. Learn more at http://bit.ly/23dxjgS.
Hydrogel superglue is 90 percent water

New “water adhesive” created by MIT engineers is tougher than natural adhesives employed by mussels and barnacles. The transparent, rubber-like material, can adhere to a variety of surfaces with a toughness comparable to the bond between tendon and cartilage on bone.
Learn more at http://bit.ly/1HulAWd.

Space

New exoplanet in our neighborhood
Though rocky and likely uninhabitable, the Earth-sized new planet, named GJ 1132b, is orbiting a small star located a mere 39 light-years from ours, making it the closest Earth-sized exoplanet yet discovered. It is also near enough for study of its atmosphere.
Learn more at http://bit.ly/1iUEeeb.

Energy & Environment

Harvesting more energy from photons
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have found a way to significantly boost the energy that can be harnessed from sunlight, a finding that could lead to better solar cells or light detectors. Quantum process increases the number of electrons produced when light strikes a metal-dielectric interface.
Learn more at http://bit.ly/1Q7SJtJ.